Posts tagged UKIP

Candidate complains “Your fox has no teeth” on Fox Tour

On what was reported to be the hottest day of the year so far, the Fox Tour headed west, into the North East Somerset constituency – formerly known as Wansdyke.

The most remarkable interview yesterday was with Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Conservative candidate. He said that he supported repeal, but when challenged that a repeal of the Hunting Act would bring back hare coursing and stag hunting too, he said he’d only talk about those issues if we brought a costume of that animal. He was also disappointed that Fergus the Fox had no visible teeth.

Today we venture deeper into the West Country. This is an area where hunting is sometimes regarded as something similar to religion, and yet we know from our vast number of supporters in the region, and from opinion polling, that support for the ban on hunting remains a huge majority.

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The Fox Tour: Arundel & South Downs

Yesterday, on day six of the Fox Tour, the team headed for the Arundel & South Down constituency in Sussex. It’s undoubtedly one of the most beautiful towns in England, set in some of the most stunning countryside in the country.

We tracked down all four candidates – Conservative, Labour, Liberal Democrat and UKIP – and had good discussions with them all, as you can see on the film.

We do, of course, disagree with Mr Herbert’s position. But we respect him for taking the time to talk to us, far more than some other pro-hunting candidates have managed, and we hope his openness will be replicated by other pro-hunting candidates.

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Fox Tour Day 1 – Corby

We launched our national Fox Tour in Corby yesterday, and over the next two-and-a-bit weeks we will be visiting key constituencies around the country where hunting is an issue, to talk to candidates and the public about threats to repeal the Hunting Act.

Corby in Northamptonshire lies amid a number of hunts, and the hunting issue divides candidates there. In our film, we meet Phil Hope, the Labour candidate who, as Labour MP for the former steel town, voted in favour of the Hunting Act. He is clear in his support for the Act.

Also keenly in favour of the Act was the UKIP candidate, David Rogerson. We went to his workplace, the Lord Nelson Inn, where he broke off from his bar duties to come and speak to us, at length.

The Conservative candidate, Louise Bagshawe, supports repeal of the Hunting Act. We knew this, but wanted to talk to her about it. We weren’t able to locate her at her office, or in the small town where she said she was going for a public meeting. She did message us via twitter, though.

Sadly we couldn’t track down the Liberal Democrat candidate, Portia Wilson, and our calls weren’t answered. We learned that she lives some distance from the constituency in Northampton and has recently had a baby; that may have been the reason why we found it difficult to reach her.

Today our Fox Tour is in Richmond, North Yorkshire. It’s the largest constituency in England, and we’ll be talking to residents and candidates about the promise by some politicians to bring back hunting with dogs. The film from today’s antics will be online tomorrow morning.

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UKIP Policy on Hunting with Dogs

We get a lot of calls to the office asking what we know about the smaller political parties’ policies on hunting. Some, like the Greens, are pretty clear. Others, like the BNP, contradict themselves, and now UKIP – the United Kingdom Independence Party – have done the same.

Their policy, contained within a document called “A Farming and rural affairs programme for an independent Britain” states that the Hunting Act has been a “practical failure” (without any explanation for this claim) but goes on to state that the future of the Hunting Act should be a decision for local communities. UKIP would give those communities the opportunity to hold a referenda on whether or not to allow hunting.

The problem for UKIP is that their policy, in reality, proposes two things. First, that the Hunting Act doesn’t work. Second, that it will allow communities to repeal it if they so wish, despite the fact that we know the vast majority of the public support the ban on hunting. So as much as they may dislike the Hunting Act, their proposal would see it left on the statute book, not repealed.

You can read the whole sorry tale for yourself here.

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